On national learned societies in SSH

New in open access, the article “Beyond borders: Examining the role of national learned societies in the social sciences and humanities”. Actually, not proper open access, as it appears you need to “log in” to Wiley to download or print (neither works for me without a log in). Thankfully Google Scholar is on the case, and having none of that nonsense — searching for the title there gets you a download link. The article is based on a spring 2020 survey of 194 learned societies in the UK and Europe. One finding is that…

Contrary to previous research, most SSH societies in our study have not undergone significant changes in the past 5 years, challenging expectations of their declining role.”

LM Studio

Run private offline ‘chat’ AIs on Windows, without wasting a day on a frustratingly complex and fiddly Python-based setup and install. The free LM Studio makes discovery, downloading and running chat LLM AI’s as easy as installing any other Windows software. A good graphics card is required to run your selected AI chat. Note also that the LM Studio wrapper requires a PC with a processor that supports AVX2. There’s also a beta release that supports older plain AVX processors.

Researcher to Reader conference

I’m pleased to learn about London’s annual Researcher to Reader Conference, which focusses on getting research to interested readers. Information Today has a detailed report of the February 2024 event…

“even today, in 2024, we don’t have consistent metadata to identify the article type in many cases with certainty (is it a research article? A review article? An editorial?) nor even the corresponding author of an article, let alone knowing how much a university is paying publishers for APCs to publish articles. Would any other industry tolerate such vagueness?”

Breakout box on a WordPress.com blog post, without CSS

How to add a breakout box, or a table-of-contents side box, to a WordPress.com blog post, with just HTML and no CSS.

Example:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.


“View source” for code.

Google kills the cache

Google is killing off its “cached” feature, reports Ars Technica. The feature kept a copy of a page for a few hours, days or weeks. Sometimes longer. The burden will now largely fall on permanent preservation in The Wayback Machine of the Internet Archive, making that service more vital than ever. However, that does have limitations, said to be ‘100 saves per day, per IP address’. Thus if your ISP puts you on a shared IP, you could be out of luck that day.

There’s also Archive.is, but there can be a queue 1,000 users long to archive a page. But it’s otherwise fast and also saves a screenshot. There are a few others, such as Perma.cc.

It might have been nice if Google had also bunged the Internet Archive $100m or so, to help them take up the slack, but Google seems to be a bit hard up these days. Ars Technica suggests the cache killing is a cost-saving move.